Dept. of Geography News & Events this Week - 9/13/16

September 13, 2016

IMAGE OF THE WEEK


A stunning view of the West Glacier/Mendenhall Glacier by Mike Nassry, taken during the CAUSE 2016 trip to Alaska.

GOOD NEWS

  • Guido Cervone received a grant from the Office of Naval Research for his project “Fusing radiation data from UAVs and social media during nuclear emergencies.”
  • Azita Ranjbar’s article, “Silence, Silencing, and (In)Visibility: The Geopolitics of Tehran’s Silent Protests” has been accepted for publication in Hypatia, a top feminist philosophy journal.
  • Send your good news to geography@psu.edu to be announced during Coffee Hour and published here.
  • Remember to submit your meetings and events for LOCAL EVENTS AND DEADLINES and CONFERENCES each week.

NEWS

Coffee Hour on September 16 with Brian King
“Eat Healthy and Nutritious Food”: Political Ecologies of Managed HIV
The HIV/AIDS epidemic has had significant impacts for social and ecological systems throughout the Global South. The epidemic has taken on a new course in recent years with improved access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) that has the potential to extend the lives of individuals for years or even decades, which has made HIV management similar to other chronic health conditions. This transition presents new relationships between citizens and the state, and the political ecologies of health for individuals and communities. This talk highlights some of these patterns in rural South Africa, drawing from a long-term research project addressing how livelihood patterns and environmental systems are responding to disease.

  • 3:30 to 5:00 p.m.
  • Refreshments are offered in 319 Walker Building at 3:30 p.m.
  • The lecture begins in 112 Walker Building at 4:00 p.m.
  • Coffee Hour To Go Webcast 
  • Next week: Department of Geography graduate student lightening talks

NEWS

Coffee Hour on September 16 with Brian King
“Eat Healthy and Nutritious Food”: Political Ecologies of Managed HIV
The HIV/AIDS epidemic has had significant impacts for social and ecological systems throughout the Global South. The epidemic has taken on a new course in recent years with improved access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) that has the potential to extend the lives of individuals for years or even decades, which has made HIV management similar to other chronic health conditions. This transition presents new relationships between citizens and the state, and the political ecologies of health for individuals and communities. This talk highlights some of these patterns in rural South Africa, drawing from a long-term research project addressing how livelihood patterns and environmental systems are responding to disease.

  • 3:30 to 5:00 p.m.
  • Refreshments are offered in 319 Walker Building at 3:30 p.m.
  • The lecture begins in 112 Walker Building at 4:00 p.m.
  • Coffee Hour To Go Webcast 
  • Next week: Department of Geography graduate student lightening talks

Tenure track geography faculty job posting
The Department of Geography at The Pennsylvania State University invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the assistant or associate professor rank. We seek an established scholar whose research and teaching contributes to the area of Environment and Society as a subfield of Geography. Areas of investigation could include water resources, sustainability, health, urbanization, social justice, globalization, global environmental change, planning, or governance. A Ph.D. in Geography or a related field is expected at the time of appointment. It is expected that applicants in related fields will demonstrate how their work will fit within a diverse Geography department. Excellence in teaching, research, and service is expected, as is the development of an extramurally funded research program. For more information and to apply visit:https://psu.jobs/job/66474

 

How land use affects the spread of disease
Protecting the landscape may also help protect people from some infectious diseases, according to Erica Smithwick, associate professor of geography. Smithwick and her colleagues have been investigating how land use has affected the spread of two diseases in sub-Saharan Africa.

 

Infectious disease transmission: It’s who you know and where you go
Public health researchers have long used social networks to understand the spread of infectious diseases, but those social networks often have gaps. A team of researchers recently showed that spatial analysis can help fill in those gaps, leading to a more complete picture of disease transmission and ways to mediate the risk, particularly for those who are most vulnerable.


“DOG” OF THE WEEK

Who is this dog? Who is her family?

Each week we feature a photo of a mystery animal companion. Any animal companion can be the dog of the week. Have fun guessing which human cares for this creature and learning about the members of our community.

Send your photos and/or your guesses to geography@psu.edu. The identity of the mystery animal and the correct guesser will be revealed next week.



This email is an abridged version, view the complete post and previous posts at:http://sites.psu.edu/dogblog/
DoG enews is published weekly on Tuesdays by the Department of Geography at Penn State during the fall and spring semesters.
Submit your news by Monday morning (or sooner) to geography@psu.edu for inclusion in that week's post.